Aamir Khan is the Indian Oprah Winfrey

by aditimittal

I saw Satyamev Jayate. Everyone was doing it; I HAD to know what Twitter would be outraging about for the next one week. I incidentally missed the 11:00 a.m. telecast for a very well deserved viewing of Vicky Donor. Juhi Chatervedi has written one of the sharpest B’wood scripts of the year. Also I have a Lady Boner for Vicky Donor Ayushman Khurana. I feel no shame in admitting it.

One thing that first struck me was the 11:00 a.m. Sunday slot of Satyamev Jayate. For me, it harkens the lazy Sunday mornings in boarding school, the one time of the week that all of us gathered to watch Chaayageet, Duck Tales, Tales Spin ( — the Hindi title tracks for which were sung by Amit Kumar who sang “Bade Acche Lagte Hain” in the film (wait for it) Balika Badhu.) Satyamev Jayate chose Sunday morning–when it was T.V watching time for the whole family.

The inclusivity of it all is evident. Even in one of the promos he mentions that he wants everyone from the maalkin to the maid to be able to see and identify with the show. That has been well achieved.

And let’s face it Aamir Khan has barely ever given us a bad product. (Except for Mela. Apart from the cult “Dekho 2000 zamaana aa gaya,” that movie sucked.)  But he’s been one Khan who has managed to remain mainstream without selling out. In a country where the urban tastes are so diverse from the centers, he has managed to produce quality content for both audiences throughout his career. Internal issues notwithstanding, I trust this guy. I want to hear what he’s got to say.

Satyamev Jayate was an educational module–barely any show-sha that we’re used to when the stars of silver screen step into the confines of a television screen. The subject of the first episode was female foeticide.  The show followed a simple, almost academic “statement of problem-examples of problem in different strata-consequences-research so far- ACTION” rule while Aamir Khan, the Indian Oprah brought out stories, tears and some very valid points of view that left all of us slightly uncomfortable in our seats. Over a span of 1.5 hours, I had my sinuses cleared. But the most admirable part came when he spurred us into action. Satyamev Jayate means to empower us, that WE are the ones who are the change. And as fashionable as it is to be conveniently cynical, I find myself looking forward to watching the second episode. You’ve got me by the heart-strings Aamir Khan, let’s hear some beautiful melodies now.

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